Claims for Concussion Injuries in Sports: The Trickle-Down Effect

The University of Calgary’s Integrated Concussion Research Program has recently released exciting research that has led to the development of a tool that will allow doctors “to accurately and rapidly measure proteins and small molecules known to indicate an injury that is present in the brain”. This tool is set for clinical trials, with the goal that the device will be able to detect brain injuries hours after the trauma occurred.

While this research can potentially revolutionize treatment for those with brain injuries, I wanted to explain to those seeking compensation for concussion injuries that there has been a “trickle-down” effect. Continue reading

Can you recover damages for a slip and fall on an icy sidewalk?

Walking on city sidewalks in Alberta in the winter and colder spring months can be treacherous. Many homeowners neglect to shovel the snow on city sidewalks in front of their homes following a snowfall, even though city and town bylaws require them to do so. In Edmonton, the city bylaw requires that a homeowner shovel the city sidewalk that runs alongside their property within 48 hours of the snowfall – in Calgary, the requirement is within 24 hours. Even if a homeowner shovels the city sidewalk, and perhaps also sands or salts, the sidewalk can remain treacherous, and pedestrians can slip and fall. Continue reading

2018 Alberta Minor Injury Cap Announced

What is the cap for soft tissue injury compensation claims in Alberta?

The Superintendent of Insurance, Nilam Jetha, has announced the 2018 soft tissue (minor injury) cap amount.  Since 2004, minor soft tissue injuries, including minor sprains and strains, have been limited by the government.  In 2004 the minor injury cap was $4,000 and that has moved up due to inflation to $5,080 in 2018, a 1.2% increase from 2017.

Before 2004 a less severe injury that lasted 3- 6 months may have been worth anywhere from $5,000 – $15,000 for the pain and suffering.  Since that time, the minor injury cap puts a limit on these less severe injuries and is set each year by the government.   Continue reading

Why You Need At Least $2 Million of Third Party Liability Coverage In Your Automobile Insurance Policy

What is the main purpose of third-party liability?

Third party liability coverage in an automobile insurance policy will cover you if you are at-fault in a motor vehicle accident. In addition to giving you peace of mind, the main purpose of third-party liability coverage is to protect your assets in the event damages are assessed against you.

Standard practice for insurance companies and insurance brokers in Alberta is to recommend $1 million in third-party liability coverage in an automobile insurance policy. As a personal injury law firm, we urge you not to default to this standard practice, rather purchase $2 million or more in third-party liability insurance. Continue reading

Avoiding Motorcycle Accidents: Answering the Call of the Road Safely

Baby Boomers grew up with Easy Rider, and for Millennials and others, the romance of the motorcycle endures. Unfortunately, a personal injury lawyer sees all too frequently the harsh reality for many motorcyclists – a tragic accident, often resulting in catastrophic injuries or death.

Safety Tips for Motorcyclists

As a personal injury lawyer who was seen the downside of the call of the road, I offer the following tips for safer motorcycle riding:

  • Before each ride inspect your bike to make sure everything is in working order and inspect the tires to make sure they are properly inflated.
  • Don’t speed – excessive speed is frequently a contributing factor in most motorcycle accident cases.
Continue reading

Soft Tissue Injury Cap Amount Announced by Alberta Government for 2017

What is the cap for soft tissue injury compensation claims in Alberta?

The Superintendent of Insurance, Nilam Jetha, has announced the 2017 soft tissue (minor injury) cap amount.  Since 2004, minor soft tissue injuries, including minor sprains and strains, have been limited by the government.  In 2004 the minor injury cap was $4,000 and that has moved up due to inflation to $5,020 in 2017.

Before 2004 a less severe injury that lasted 3- 6 months may have been worth anywhere from $5,000 – $15,000 for the pain and suffering.  Since that time, the minor injury cap puts a limit on these less severe injuries and is set each year by the government.   Continue reading